Bone Suckin' Sauce Loves The Media !
Rated # 1 Newsweek, Health, Food & Wine Magazines!
“Raleigh company’s barbecue sauce has made big impression with memorable name”

Honey and molasses give western N.C.-style sauce sweeter taste”
“Raleigh company’s barbecue sauce has made big impression with memorable name”

“Raleigh — Let’s face it: When you name a product “Bone Suckin’ Sauce”, you’re making quite a statement.

You’re saying that the sauce is so good that people literally will want to eat every last drop - a pretty bold assertion given how picky barbecue aficionados can be about their sauces. You’re also saying that you’re a company that’s willing to take chances, unafraid that the name will be seen simply as a gimmick that overshadows the product itself.
Full Story
Rated # 1 Barbecue Sauce by Health Magazine!
We tested 49 tangy, sweet, and spicy sauces.
By Susan Hall
Health Magazine June 2006
Bone Suckin’ Sauce, Thicker Style You can see the chunks of onion and peppers in this tangy-sweet, Carolina-style sauce. We love that it’s naturally sweetened with honey and molasses, and packed with flavor from apple cider vinegar, horse-radish, and mustard. With all this and a hint of smoke, Bone Suckin’ Sauce is great for grilling and dipping.Grade A+
Rated # 1 Barbecue Sauce by Newsweek Magazine!

BONE SUCKIN' SAUCE, RALEIGH, N.C.
There are a million barbecue sauces, but we fell for the Ford family's... The sauce rocks. bonesuckin.com

"Sensational"

This is us at the National Association for The Specialty Food Trade New York Food Show. (Right to left Grandma Mae, Sheila, Laura, Sandi, Laurie, (Row 2) Patrick and Pebbles.)

"The annual New York City Fancy Foods Show gave the Fords an opportunity to spread the word about Bone Suckin' BBQ Sauce."
"Balanced Flavor" by Taste of the South Magazine
Bone Suckin' Blackberry Chicken Salad
Bone Suckin' Sauce, (2) 16 oz. jars
Chicken Breast, skinless & boneless, 4
Blackberries, 1 cup
Walnuts, 1/2 cup
Gourmet Greens Salad Mix, 16 oz.

Place chicken breast in an oven safe pan. Pour 1 1/2 jars of Bone Suckin' Sauce all over the chicken. Cook at 350° in oven until done. Cut into strips. Place on gourmet greens salad bed with fresh blackberries and shelled walnut pieces. Pour remaining 1/2 jar of Bone Suckin' Sauce over the salad and serve.
Recipe Card 3 X 5
What the judges said: “Balanced flavor.” “Sweet and mild.”
Two generations of the Ford family of Raleigh, North Carolina, joined together to create Ford’s Foods’ Bone Suckin’ Sauce. “It was my grandmother’s recipe,” recalls Patrick Ford. “My uncle, Phil Ford, refined it, and my mother, Sandi Ford, named it.”

The sauce’s colorful name is a nod to Sandi’s mother, who grew up during the Great Depression. “They were so poor, they sucked the sauce off the bones,” Patrick explains.
The Ford family has been in the food business for many years. Patrick’s great-grandfather, Andrew J. Ford, founded Ford’s Produce, the first produce house at the old city market in Raleigh in 1946. After his parents, Lynn and Sandi...expanded it to include Ford’s Fancy Fruits & Gourmet, a gourmet fruit basket company. “We get to enjoy all aspects of the food business,” he says. Of course, Bone Suckin’ Sauce is one of Ford’s featured products.
Patrick, who serves at the company’s international marketing director, has marketed the sauce in 26 countries. How does it go over in Europe? “They love it,” Patrick says. “They absolutely love it.” The all-natural, tomato-based sauce, sweetened with honey and molasses, is popular overseas as a glaze for fish.
"Barbecue sauce worth sampling, right down to the bone”
“Phil Ford of Raleigh, N.C., is known for his “pig pickings” what folks up North would call barbecued pig. His thick, tangy sauce, however needs no translation.
Called Bone Suckin’ Sauce because his sister-in-law and partner Sandi Ford likes it so much she literally sucks it off the chicken and rib bones. Ford’s concoction is made with tomato paste, vinegar, honey, molasses, mustard, horseradish, lemon juice, garlic and onions. It also has a slightly smoky flavor.
Ford developed the sauce while trying to replicate one his mother had found especially pleasing. When he served it during a family gathering, everyone liked his blend better than the original, even his mother.
Marketed commercially in the Raleigh area since last fall, Bone Suckin’ sauce only recently has become available in these parts. Bone Suckin’ Sauce can be purchased at Schaefer’s Wines, Foods & Spirits, 9965 Gross Point Rd., Skokie. It also can be ordered by mail from Ford’s Fancy Fruits in Raleigh, N.C.: 800-446-0947. Cost is about $6 per 16-ounce jar.” Chicago Tribune
"Bring Home The Kosher Bacon"

"Bone Suckin' Mustard spiked with molasses and jalapenos sounds like it belongs slathered on pork chops - which is exactly what Patrick Ford of Ford's Gourmet Foods told a potential buyer last week. From the expression on the guy's face, Ford quickly realized that was perhaps not the best pitch for a product at Kosherfest, the country's foremost kosher expo, held in New York City.

Bagels and gefilte fish are still represented among the hundreds of foods, but many exhibitors are folks like Ford who are offering up new tastes.
"The origins of the business were rooted in the first produce house at the old city market of Raleigh in 1946.
Southern Grower

The present owners, Lynn and Sandi Ford, came into the family  business in 1973 and expanded the business in 1986 by creating “Ford’s Fancy Fruits & Gourmet Foods,”

which sold fruit baskets with NC peanuts, later expanding to open 2 retail stores carrying more than 300 NC gourmet food items from around the State.  In 1992 they joined forces with a brother-in-law, Phillip Ford, who improved his mother’s recipe for barbeque sauce, and created an all natural, tomato based sauce sweetened with honey and molasses..Full Story
"Fancy Foods From N.C." By Fred Thompson

"Fords Foods of Raleigh introduced an extension of its popular Bone Suckin 'Sauce line, Bone Suckin' Rib Rub. "As we speak, there are more new products in the works," said Patrick Ford, the company's international marketing director.

Already on the market are Margarita Nuts, a variation on the Ford's Wine Nuts, roasted peanuts flavored with Chardonnay and Merlot. "It's a long way from the days of selling the sauce from the trunk of my car and having my apartment stacked to the ceiling," Ford said. Thursday, July 10, 2003
“New Trend in Kosher” “Bone Suckin’ Sauce”

“With the summer barbecue season in full swing, the perfect condiment is the Bone Suckin’ Sauce line, available in 4 flavors: Regular, Hot, Regular Thicker style and Hot Thicker style. Bone Suckin’ Sauce is all-natural, fat free, gluten free, certified kosher by the “OK” and a best seller among specialty stores, grocery stores and restaurants.

Also available is the Bone Suckin’ Mustard, which debuted at the San Francisco NASFT Show in January 2001, as well as the Bone Suckin’ Salsa, Big Chunks Style. The salsa is fresh, chunky, full of plump juicy tomatoes, red and yellow crisp Holland gourmet peppers, domestic green bell peppers and a small hint of garlic.

The Bone Suckin’ Sauce Hiccuppin’ Hot is all-natural, fat free, gluten free and is made from the powder from one of the hottest peppers in the world – the habanera – blended with the flavor of the Hot Bone Suckin’ Sauce. This sauce is so flavorful and delicious, and when the heat catches up with you it takes your breath away!

For the most successful ribs you’ve ever cooked, use Bone Suckin’ Sauce Rib Rub. It is also great on chicken, fish, pasta, vegetables, steaks and marinating just about everything. July 2003

“Cuisine Review” “Wares BBQ sauces” “Bone Suckin’ Sauce (Original)”

“Phil Ford developed this sauce in 1987 while trying to copy his mother’s recipe for a western North Carolina-style sauce. But it was his sister-in-law that named it and prodded retail launching in 1992. The smooth sauce has honey sweetness with a tangy twist of tomato and vinegar. Go to ironq.com to purchase, or for a store locator map, see BoneSuckin.com.”June 2003

"Fancy Foods From N.C." By Fred Thompson

"Fords Foods of Raleigh introduced an extension of its popular Bone Suckin 'Sauce line, Bone Suckin' Rib Rub. "As we speak, there are more new products in the works," said Patrick Ford, the company's international marketing director.

Already on the market are Margarita Nuts, a variation on the Ford's Wine Nuts, roasted peanuts flavored with Chardonnay and Merlot. "It's a long way from the days of selling the sauce from the trunk of my car and having my apartment stacked to the ceiling," Ford said. Thursday, July 10, 2003
Tangy and smoky with a real kick.” Bone Suckin' Sauce Hot Flavor

“News & Notes” “Taste Test Bottled Barbecue Sauce” Bone Suckin’ Sauce Hot

Staff comment: “Tangy and smoky with a real kick.” Interesting bite: “The company president’s grandmother used to suck the sauce off ribs and chicken bones, hence the name.” June 2003

“Best of the BBQ Sauces!

“Best of the BBQ Sauces! When the staff of Food & Wine magazine recently did a taste test of 27 national barbecue sauces, one of the four that came out on top was Bone Suckin’ Sauce Hot, from Ford’s Foods in Raleigh.

“Tangy and smoky with a real kick” is the staff comment about the Bone Suckin’ Sauce published in the magazine’s June grilling issue. First marketed in 1992, this Western North Carolina-style sauce with the colorful name is flavored with honey and horseradish, among other ingredients.” Tuesday, June 3, 2003 By Susan Houston
“Back burner” “Bone Suckin’ Good”

“Bone Suckin’: adj., good; beyond tasty; past succulent; way ahead of delicious, all the way to an etiquette-ignoring effort to extract the last hint of flavor without swallowing the medium by which it is delivered; noun, as in Ford’s Foods Bone Suckin’ line of Sauces, Mustard, Rubs, and Salsas.
Full Story

Judging by the greasy fingerprints around our buying department, everyone agrees how good it tastes!

Cumbria England
Out of the Kitchen

“When Phil Ford from the USA perfected this southern-style, spicy barbecue sauce, his sister-in-law tried to come up with a name. It occurred to her that it made her do something she’d never done before; suck the bone to get every last bit of flavour! And judging by the greasy fingerprints around our buying department, everyone agrees how good it tastes! The tomato, honey and cider vinegar based sauce with the mandatory lashings of onions, garlic and pepper! Bone Suckin' Suace is all natural, fat free and not only brilliant for barbecues but also a great all rounder for grilling, marinating and dipping. It certainly requires some serious samplin'. September 2001
"First the heat, then the sweet. Nice!" Bone Suckin' Sauce Hot Flavor

Taste Test - Barbecue Sauces

One of the more popular chores at Food & Wine in recent days was taste-testing store-bought barbecue sauces. Visits to local supermarkets and specialty food stores yielded some 25 varieties, and we tasted them all, with ribs, brisket and pulled pork. Here, our four favorites. - M.F.F.

Bone Suckin' Sauce Hot
Staff Comments - "First the heat, then the sweet.  Nice!" Interesting Bite - Patrick Ford who makes it says, "It's my grandmother's recipe, doctored by my uncle and named by my mother."

"First the heat, then the sweet. Nice!" Bone Suckin' Sauce Hot Flavor

Airport Food - Barbecue Sauce

Many of today's airports stock regional foods worth carrying home. This sauce, sold in North and South Carolina airports (and stores), is called Bone Suckin' Sauce for good reason.  You gnaw the ribs right down to the bone. The sauce comes in regular and hot, and it's sheer pleasure to eat. 800/446-0947. - article by Carrol Stoner

Award-winning pepper sauces put the Triangle on the chilehead map

And when they find flavor, they look for heat. Almost as soon as Ford's Foods Inc. of Raleigh introduced its Bone Suckin' Sauce, a tomato-based, honey and molasses, Western North Carolina style barbecue sauce, many

customers said it wasn't hot enough, Patrick Ford says. Ford's added Bone Suckin' Hot but it still wasn't enough for some. So in 1996, the company introduced Hiccuppin' Hot, the Bone Suckin' formula plus habaneros. "Finally a hot with flavor" is the product's slogan. "It's one of the hottest sauces you can get," Ford says, "but it has flavor." article by Susan Houston
Bone Suckin' Mustard...joins the spectacular barbecue Bone Suckin' Sauce

New Products - an eclectic assortment of the latest consumer goods

Bone Suckin' Mustard. In the mustard category, Bone Suckin' Mustard from Ford's Fancy Fruits and Gourmet Foods, Raleigh, N.C. joins the spectacular barbecue Bone Suckin' Sauce, Bone Suckin' Salsa and Hiccuppin' Hot Sauce from one of the country's leading barbecue and marinade companies. Items in this line gain attention and sales -- the name stops the consumers, and the flavor brings them back for more. - article by Robert McMath

Just what's needed to spice up ribs, barbecue, chicken, and even meat loaf.  

Spicy Stories

For its name alone, Bone Suckin' Sauce is well-nigh irresistible. The folks at Ford's Foods, Inc., Raleigh, N.C., didn't just stop with the name, however, and this North Carolina-style...sauce is just what's needed to spice up ribs, barbecue, chicken, and even meat loaf.  Throw in Ford's Hiccuppin' Hot Sauce and Bone Suckin' Salsa, and you'be got one hot meal. The caloric quotient is dialed down somewhat in its Blessing's (Now Bone Suckin' Mustard), which is totally unlike any mustard you've ever tasted. Sugar and molasses make the difference, but the paprika and jalapenos added in will get you attention., All of which helps explain why Ford's corporate motto is 'nuff said.

Best in Business awards

“What do Jim Goodnight, a Lexus, G105’s Bob and Madison, Bone Suckin' Sauce and the West End Wine Bar have in common? Nothing much other than they all came out on top in Triangle Business Journal’s 1998 Best in Business awards contest.” July 6, 1998

“New company launches Bone Suckin’ Sauce. Raleigh, NC” ~ March 1993

“Industry veterans Sandi and Lynn Ford have stayed out of the manufacturing side of the specialty food business. Until now.

The husband and wife team, which operates Ford’s Fancy Fruits, a specialty produce wholesale business, a gourmet retail shop by the same name, and a seasonal mail order business, jumped into the supply side in late 1992 with the Incorporation of Fords Foods, maker of Bone Suckin’ barbecue sauce.

Following a recipe created by Lynn’s brother, Phillip Ford, now vice president of Fords Foods, the new company began selling his sauce in November to several North Carolina gourmet shops. Encouraged holiday sales, which exceeded 500 cases, the Fords signed Quinn’s Specialty Products, Raeford, NC to co-pack the sauce as it began to explore wholesale opportunities.

The company participated in its list trade show, The Flavors of Carolina, on January 27, in an effort to attract broker representation. Ford Foods also hopes to build brand recognition by participating in the second annual “Battle of the Sauces,” a local barbecue sauce competition scheduled for March 6 in Raleigh.

Sandi Ford thinks both the taste and the name will sell the sauce. “The honey and molasses make it sweet and the onions, garlic, and horseradish give it a spicy flavor,” she says. “It’s all natural and made of all quality products. There’s no skimping, so it is more expensive. The name is funny, so they buy it.” And re-buy it, according to Ford.

Available in 16-ounce glass jars... Food-service sizes also are available.” March 1993